Dodson instructs her team in a huddle.

Cami Dodson instructs her team in a huddle.

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Sugar-Salem’s Cami Dodson retired from her position as head coach of the Diggers volleyball team Monday ending an 11-year tenure that included five state volleyball titles. Dodson’s announcement ends her 20-year coaching career that started at Sugar-Salem as the C-team coach under Tricia Chatterton. After two years with the Diggers, Dodson went to Rigby High School where she eventually worked her way up to head coach before moving back to Sugar-Salem. “Cami is one of the most thorough and complete coaches that I’ve had a chance to work with,” said Jay Miller who hired Dodson in 2010. “It’s not just the fact that she presents and trains the fundamental things— she brings it down to its smallest component so that the volleyball players understand why their stance needs to be a specific way, why their hands need to be in a specific place. She works on the skill drill part of her practices and is really intense and is very specific and you can see the results.” Dodson’s teams have won five of the last six 3A state volleyball championships including the last three. Miller said he feels proud to have worked with Dodson and said that he enjoyed working with her. “If you’re around her very long, (you’ll notice) she is ultra caring,” Miller said. “She really cares about the individuals, not just as an athlete but as a person too. That’s really helped her be successful and consistent over all the years she’s been involved with it.” Despite Dodson’s success she’s ready to end her career. “We just felt like it was time to be done and to let someone else enjoy the ride and start a new adventure in a different direction,” Dodson said. One major factor in Dodson’s decision is the health of her mother who lives in Rigby and is experiencing memory loss. Dodson and her family are counseling among themselves and with health care professionals to decide how to best help Dodson’s mother. Dodson’s siblings live in Montana and Wyoming. “I’m the only sibling that’s close to Rigby now,” Dodson said. Another part of Dodson’s decision centered around her family. Dodson coached her two girls (Chaise and Camber) on the volleyball team when they played in high school. And Chaise, Camber, her son Chandler and her husband, Derek each helped coach her teams in some capacity over the last three years. And her son Caden, who lives in Sugar, helped film the games. “I thought for sure I was going to be done after Camber graduated (in 2020), Dodson said. “But, I was still enjoying the time there and then we moved into a different phase where my kids were coaching alongside me. And that was really fun too.” Each of Dodson’s descendants plan to head in different directions in the coming years as Camber will continue her studies at USU Eastern, Chandler will continue his studies at BYU-Idaho, Caden will head to a mechanical engineering graduate school program this year and Chaise will go to graduate school the following year. Dodson said stepping away from coaching volleyball came down to prioritizing family. “It was something that strengthened our family and brought us together,” Dodson said. “The minute it was starting to pull us in different directions I decided to be done because my family’s always been my first priority.” Dodson will continue working as the librarian at Sugar-Salem. “I love my job there,” Dodson said. “My husband has a business here and we love the area. We’re just not coaching right now.” Dodson said she has no plans of returning to coaching despite some thoughts she’s had about trying to help coach a college team. “I love coaching and my heart’s there but right now, we’re done with that part,” Dodson said. “We’ve talked about if it would be fun to try the next level at some point in time, but that’s not on our radar at all.” Dodson said she’ll most miss the girls whom she’s worked with. “It’s meant everything to have open-armed support from day one,” Dodson said. “You always have your ups and downs with different issues and things that happen, but overall, the community here just loves and supports and envelops you. The girls have been amazing to buy into our program 100 percent. The parents buy in. The support we have is incredible. That’s where I feel like our success has come from.” Just because Dodson feels sure of her decision doesn’t mean it was an easy one. “I can easily say it’s one of the most difficult decisions I’ve had to make,” Dodson said. “A lot of prayer. A lot of thought. A lot of counsel from my family and the people at the school, my administration. They’ve been great to listen to my concerns and give me the time that I needed to make the decision.”

Sugar-Salem’s Cami Dodson retired from her position as head coach of the Diggers volleyball team Monday ending an 11-year tenure that included five state volleyball titles.

Dodson’s announcement ends her 20-year coaching career that started at Sugar-Salem as the C-team coach under Tricia Chatterton. After two years with the Diggers, Dodson went to Rigby High School where she eventually worked her way up to head coach before moving back to Sugar-Salem.

“Cami is one of the most thorough and complete coaches that I’ve had a chance to work with,” said Jay Miller who hired Dodson in 2010. “It’s not just the fact that she presents and trains the fundamental things— she brings it down to its smallest component so that the volleyball players understand why their stance needs to be a specific way, why their hands need to be in a specific place. She works on the skill drill part of her practices and is really intense and is very specific and you can see the results.”

Dodson’s teams have won five of the last six 3A state volleyball championships including the last three.

Miller said he feels proud to have worked with Dodson and said that he enjoyed working with her.

“If you’re around her very long, (you’ll notice) she is ultra caring,” Miller said. “She really cares about the individuals, not just as an athlete but as a person too. That’s really helped her be successful and consistent over all the years she’s been involved with it.”

Despite Dodson’s success she’s ready to end her career.

“We just felt like it was time to be done and to let someone else enjoy the ride and start a new adventure in a different direction,” Dodson said.

One major factor in Dodson’s decision is the health of her mother who lives in Rigby and is experiencing memory loss. Dodson and her family are counseling among themselves and with health care professionals to decide how to best help Dodson’s mother. Dodson’s siblings live in Montana and Wyoming.

“I’m the only sibling that’s close to Rigby now,” Dodson said.

Another part of Dodson’s decision centered around her family.

Dodson coached her two girls (Chaise and Camber) on the volleyball team when they played in high school. And Chaise, Camber, her son Chandler and her husband, Derek each helped coach her teams in some capacity over the last three years. And her son Caden, who lives in Sugar, helped film the games.

“I thought for sure I was going to be done after Camber graduated (in 2020), Dodson said. “But, I was still enjoying the time there and then we moved into a different phase where my kids were coaching alongside me. And that was really fun too.”

Each of Dodson’s descendants plan to head in different directions in the coming years as Camber will continue her studies at USU Eastern, Chandler will continue his studies at BYU-Idaho, Caden will head to a mechanical engineering graduate school program this year and Chaise will go to graduate school the following year.

Dodson said stepping away from coaching volleyball came down to prioritizing family.

“It was something that strengthened our family and brought us together,” Dodson said. “The minute it was starting to pull us in different directions I decided to be done because my family’s always been my first priority.”

Dodson will continue working as the librarian at Sugar-Salem.

“I love my job there,” Dodson said. “My husband has a business here and we love the area. We’re just not coaching right now.”

Dodson said she has no plans of returning to coaching despite some thoughts she’s had about trying to help coach a college team.

“I love coaching and my heart’s there but right now, we’re done with that part,” Dodson said. “We’ve talked about if it would be fun to try the next level at some point in time, but that’s not on our radar at all.”

Dodson said she’ll most miss the girls whom she’s worked with.

“It’s meant everything to have open-armed support from day one,” Dodson said. “You always have your ups and downs with different issues and things that happen, but overall, the community here just loves and supports and envelops you. The girls have been amazing to buy into our program 100 percent. The parents buy in. The support we have is incredible. That’s where I feel like our success has come from.”

Just because Dodson feels sure of her decision doesn’t mean it was an easy one.

“I can easily say it’s one of the most difficult decisions I’ve had to make,” Dodson said. “A lot of prayer. A lot of thought. A lot of counsel from my family and the people at the school, my administration. They’ve been great to listen to my concerns and give me the time that I needed to make the decision.”