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The Big Sky Conference is extremely geographically dispersed, with schools as far north as Spokane, Washington and as far south as Flagstaff, Arizona; as far east as Greeley, Colorado, and as far west as Portland. With that in mind, conference schools are facing vastly different situations as they try to prepare for the fall semester — and the football season — while taking precautions against the novel coronavirus. Idaho State athletic director Pauline Thiros recently said that everything is currently “all systems go” for Big Sky football in the fall, but that could change in a hurry. With that in mind, the Idaho State Journal is tracking COVID-19 statistics and reopening progress at every school in the conference. Which schools are in coronavirus hotspots, and which are in areas that haven’t been affected yet? Which are in states that are well on the road to reopening, and which are lagging behind? These are the numbers that will determine what Big Sky football looks like in the fall.

All COVID-19 case numbers are from the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center database, unless otherwise noted. This story will be updated.

ARIZONA

Northern Arizona

Coconino County

June 2: 1,155 confirmed cases (fifth in the state, 808.52 per 100k), 81 deaths

June 10: 1,289 confirmed cases (sixth in the state, 902.32 per 100k), 85 deaths, 11.6% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 1,393 confirmed cases (seventh in the state, 975.12 per 100k), 88 deaths, 8.1% increase from the week before

June 24: 1,595 confirmed cases (seventh in the state, 1,116.52 per 100k), 90 deaths, 14.5% increase from the week before

Arizona’s stay-at-home order expired on May 15. NAU has not yet opened campus facilities for voluntary workouts, according to Arizona Daily Sun sports editor Lance Hartzler. Organized youth sports and activities are currently allowed in the state under physical distancing guidelines, although Hartzler said that leagues in Flagstaff have not yet resumed playing.

June 10 update: Flagstaff high schools released a plan for Phase 1 of returning to practice on June 8, according to the Arizona Daily Sun. Players and coaches are required to undergo temperature checks, as well as observing other social distancing measures. Two local high schools have started football practices in accordance with those guidelines, according to the Daily Sun.

June 17 update: Although Coconino County's numbers haven't exploded, Arizona as a whole is one of the states experiencing the biggest growth in the rate of new cases over the last two weeks, according to Johns Hopkins. The state, which recommended but didn't mandate the use of masks, on Wednesday allowed local governments to start setting rules for the use of masks. Early indications from Flagstaff are that masks will be made mandatory in public, which could help keep local case numbers down.

June 24 update: Arizona set new highs in the number of daily cases in the last week, with over 3,000 confirmed cases on both June 17 and 18. Per ProPublica's dashboard, the rate of positive tests per 100,000 people has gone up more in the last two weeks in Arizona than in any other state.

CALIFORNIA

Cal Poly

San Luis Obispo County

June 2: 271 confirmed cases (26th in the state, 95.42 per 100k), 1 death

June 10: 302 confirmed cases (27th in the state, 106.33 per 100k), 1 death, 11.4% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 356 confirmed cases (27th in the state, 125.35 per 100k), 1 death, 17.9% increase from the week before

June 24: 453 confirmed cases (27th in the state, 159.50 per 100k), 1 death, 27.2% increase from the week before

Sacramento State

Sacramento County

June 2: 1,429 confirmed cases (16th in the state, 92.73 per 100k), 58 deaths

June 10: 1,624 confirmed cases (16th in the state, 105.39 per 100k), 61 deaths, 13.7% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 1,825 confirmed cases (17th in the state, 118.43 per 100k), 63 deaths, 12.4% increase from the week before

June 24: 2,374 confirmed cases (17th in the state, 154.06 per 100k), 66 deaths, 30.1% increase from the week before

UC Davis

Yolo County

June 2: 211 confirmed cases (25th in the state, 95.73 per 100k), 24 deaths

June 10: 226 confirmed cases (29th in the state, 102.54 per 100k), 24 deaths, 7.1% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 265 confirmed cases, (28th in the state, 120.23 per 100k), 24 deaths, 17.3% increase from the week before

June 24: 366 confirmed cases (28th in the state, 166.06 per 100k), 24 deaths, 38.1% increase from the week before

California is one of several states that adopted a regional reopening plan. Currently, the state is in Stage 2 of its reopening plan, which allows some retail, manufacturing and offices to reopen, but some counties that hit benchmarks in case metrics and preparedness are moving through that stage faster. Currently, all three counties that have Big Sky schools have hit those marks, allowing them to also reopen dine-in restaurants, among other things. Both Cal Poly and Sacramento State are members of the California State University system, which has said that classes will be almost entirely virtual in the fall, with few students allowed on campus. UC Davis is part of the University of California system, and is currently proposing a hybrid option in which students will be allowed to take classes online in the fall if they choose, according to the Yolo County Enterprise.

June 10 update: California is scheduled to move into Stage 3 of its reopening on June 12, which would allow "higher-risk" businesses, such as movie theaters and gyms, to reopen with distancing measures in place. Currently, all three counties with Big Sky schools remain in Advanced Stage 2, which allows restaurants and retail to be open but places limits on gatherings.

June 17 update: Big Sky commissioner Tom Wistrcill and Sacramento State athletic director Mark Orr told Greg Rachac of 406mtsports.com on June 16 that both California State University schools in the conference — Sac State and Cal Poly — are eligible and planning to play football in the fall. According to HERO Sports, both Cal Poly and Sac State opened up facilities for voluntary workouts in the past week — the Hornets on June 10 and the Mustangs on June 15.

June 24 update: The state remains in Stage 3 of reopening, with no date set to move to Stage 4. In fact, California Governor Gavin Newsom said on June 22 that the state could reverse reopening plans if case numbers continue to climb. California also saw new one-day numbers for confirmed cases this week, with over 6,000 cases reported on June 22.

COLORADO

Northern Colorado

Weld County

June 2: 2,501 confirmed cases (fourth in the state, 797 per 100k), 132 deaths

June 10: 2,604 confirmed cases (fourth in the state, 828.49 per 100k), 135 deaths, 4.1% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 2,671 confirmed cases (fourth in the state, 849.81 per 100k), 136 deaths, 2.6% increase from the week before

June 24: 2,730 confirmed cases (fourth in the state, 868.58 per 100k), 136 deaths, 2.2% increase from the week before

Colorado’s stay-at-home order expired on April 26, and the state is now under a “safer-at-home” mandate, with essential businesses fully open and non-essential businesses operating under some restrictions. For example, Colorado allowed in-person dining (with 50% capacity) to open on June 27 and summer day camps to open on June 1. Team sports are still banned.

June 10 update: Colorado has since moved into Stage 3 of its reopening plan, titled "Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors." According to guidelines for that stage, organized youth and adult sports are now permitted in groups of up to 25 players, with distancing measures recommended.

June 17 update: Northern Colorado began voluntary workouts on June 15, per HERO Sports. Indoor gatherings of up to 100 people and outdoor gatherings of up to 175 are now allowed under the state's latest move to reopen.

June 24 update: Northern Colorado cut its men's and women's tennis programs on June 24.

IDAHO

Idaho

Latah County

June 2: 7 confirmed cases (23rd in the state, 17.44 per 100k), 0 deaths

June 10: 7 confirmed cases (23rd in the state, 17.44 per 100k), 0 deaths, 0% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 8 confirmed cases (26th in the state, 19.93 per 100k), 0 deaths, 14.3% increase from the week before

June 24: 9 confirmed cases (28th in the state, 22.42 per 100k), 0 deaths, 12.5% increase from the week before

Idaho State

Bannock County

June 2: 28 confirmed cases (15th in the state, 32.13 per 100k), 1 death

June 10: 49 confirmed cases (12th in the state, 56.23 per 100k), 1 death, 75% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 64 confirmed cases (11th in the state, 73.45 per 100k), 1 death, 30.6% increase from the week before

June 24: 82 confirmed cases (12th in the state, 94.10 per 100k, 1 death, 28.1% increase from the week before

Idaho entered Stage 3 of its reopening plan on May 30, which allowed gatherings of up to 50 people and removed the self-quarantine requirement for people coming back into the state. Idaho State opened athletic facilities for voluntary workouts on June 1. Idaho has not yet reopened athletic facilities for voluntary workouts, but is hoping to have a plan to do so by June 5, according to Colton Clark of the Lewiston Tribune. The state is currently scheduled to enter Stage 4 of reopening, which would allow gatherings of more than 50 people if physical distancing protocols are followed, on June 13. The plan for Stage 4 on the Idaho government website specifically addresses sporting venues, saying they can operate “under limited physical distancing protocols.” American Legion baseball teams in the Southeast part of the state are planning to open their seasons on or around that June 13 date, with fans encouraged to practice social distancing in the stands.

June 17 update: According to Colton Clark of the Lewiston Tribune, Idaho began screening and testing athletes this week in preparation for voluntary workouts, with those workouts hopefully starting Friday (June 19). American Legion teams in Bannock County began their seasons on June 12.

June 24 update: Like Arizona and California, Idaho set a new state-wide high for daily reported cases this week, with 223 confirmed cases on June 24 beating the previous record from early April. Idaho State reported June 20 that there were no positive tests among 115 administered to athletes and staff.

MONTANA

Montana

Missoula County

June 2: 40 confirmed cases (third in the state, 33.67 per 100k), 1 death

June 10: 40 confirmed cases (fourth in the state, 33.67 per 100k), 1 death, 0% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 42 confirmed cases (fourth in the state, 35.36 per 100k), 1 death, 5% increase from the week before

June 24: 49 confirmed cases, (fourth in the state, 41.25 per 100k), 1 death, 16.7% increase from the week before

Montana State

Gallatin County

June 2: 153 confirmed cases (most in the state, 136.76 per 100k), 1 death

June 10: 168 confirmed cases (most in the state, 150.17 per 100k), 1 death, 9.8% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 188 confirmed cases (most in the state, 168.04 per 100k), 1 death, 11.9% increase from the week before

June 24: 213 confirmed cases (most in the state, 190.39 per 100k), 1 death, 13.3% increase from the week before

Montana moved into Phase 2 of its reopening on June 1. Similarly to Idaho, that allowed gatherings of up to 50 people and ended the travel quarantine order. Montana’s Phase 2 also allows for gatherings of more than 50 people if appropriate physical distancing is maintained. According to the Missoulian and the Bozeman Daily Chronicle, both Montana and Montana State opened athletic facilities for voluntary workouts on June 1. Montana American Legion teams began play on May 21 with fans in the stands encouraged to abide by social distancing restrictions, becoming one of the first sports leagues in the country to return to competition.

June 24 update: Montana also set a new one-day high for cases in the last week with 32 confirmed cases on June 20.

OREGON

Portland State

Multnomah County

June 2: 1,171 confirmed cases (most in the state, 144.23 per 100k), 59 deaths

June 10: 1,329 confirmed cases (most in the state, 163.69 per 100k), 66 deaths, 13.5% increase from the week before

June 17: 1,598 confirmed cases (most in the state, 196.83 per 100k), 68 deaths, 20.2% increase from the week before

June 24: 1,893 confirmed cases (most in the state, 233.16 per 100k), 68 deaths, 18.5% increase from the week before

Oregon, like California, is doing a regional reopening plan. Multnomah County, the most populous county in the state and the one with the highest number of coronavirus cases, is currently the only county in the state that has not moved into Phase 1 of reopening, although the state did relax some baseline restrictions on retail in the Portland area on May 15. The Chronicle of Higher Education’s tracker says that Portland State is “waiting to decide” if it will have in-person classes in the fall.

June 10 update: The majority of counties in Oregon have moved into Phase 2 of the state's reopening plan, but Multnomah County is still the only county in Oregon that has not moved into Phase 1 yet. The state's website said that the county's plan for doing so is "under review."

June 17 update: Portland State is "tentatively" scheduled to start voluntary workouts on July 6, per HERO Sports. Multnomah County is scheduled to finally move into Phase 1 of reopening on June 19 (Friday).

June 24 update: Multnomah County has moved into Phase 1 of reopening, with face masks required indoors.

UTAH

Southern Utah

Iron County

June 2: 92 confirmed cases

June 10: 140 confirmed cases, 52.1% increase from the week before

June 17: 191 confirmed cases, 36.4% increase from the week before

June 24: 243 confirmed cases, 27.2% increase from the week before

Weber State

Weber County

June 2: 293 confirmed cases

June 10: 400 confirmed cases, 36.5% increase from the week before

June 17: 541 confirmed cases, 9 deaths, 35.3% increase from the week before

June 24: 719 confirmed cases, 10 deaths, 32.9% increase from the week before

Utah never went under a stay-at-home order but did institute several restrictions similar to other states. Many of those restrictions were lifted on May 15 as the state moved to the next phase of its reopening plan. Weber State began screening student-athletes for possible cases of COVID-19 in early June as the first step towards reopening facilities, and will need further permission from the university to open once that screening is complete, according to the Standard-Examiner's Brett Hein. The Johns Hopkins database doesn’t have accurate numbers for Iron and Weber Counties, saying that neither had any confirmed cases, so data from local health departments was used instead.

June 10 update: Weber State athletes in all sports were able to begin voluntary on-campus workouts in school facilities on June 8, according to the Standard-Examiner's Brett Hein.

June 17 update: Southern Utah began voluntary workouts on June 15, per HERO Sports.

June 24 update: Utah's 640 cases reported on June 19 were (stop me if you've heard this before) a new one-day high for the state. Southern Utah cut its men's and women's tennis programs on June 23.

WASHINGTON

Eastern Washington

Spokane County

June 2: 612 confirmed cases (sixth in the state, 118.92 per 100k), 34 deaths

June 10: 679 confirmed cases (sixth in the state, 149.43 per 100k), 37 deaths, 10.9% increase in cases from the week before

June 17: 846 confirmed cases (seventh in the state, 164.39 per 100k), 37 deaths, 24.6% increase from the week before

June 24: 1,021 confirmed cases (seventh in the state, 198.39 per 100k), 38 deaths, 20.7% increase from the week before

Washington, like California and Oregon, is employing a tiered reopening plan that allows some counties to move faster than others. Spokane County is one of 27 counties that has moved on to Phase 2, which has allowed most retail and in-person dining to re-open. To move on to Phase 3, which will allow “professional sports without audience participation,” the county must hit benchmarks based on the number of cases, test capacity and ICU bed capacity. Currently, Spokane County is meeting goals in two of five categories. Eastern Washington has not yet set a date to start opening facilities for voluntary workouts, according to a May 28 article by Ryan Collingwood at the Spokesman-Review. Eastern Washington announced May 5 that it was planning to have mostly online classes in the fall, although students can still choose to live on campus.

June 10 update: While most counties in eastern Washington have moved on to Stage 3 (seven of the eight counties in Washington that have advanced to Stage 3 are in the eastern part of the state), Spokane County is the one that has not yet, and is still meeting only two of the five categories to advance.

June 17 update: Eastern Washington started partial voluntary workouts on June 15, per HERO Sports. Spokane County remains in Phase 2 of reopening.

June 24 update: Spokane County remains in Phase 2.