MAYOR DAVID OGDEN

Occupations and Age:

I am retired from banking, finance and economics development for 38 years. I worked with both private and public entities to create jobs and other economic developments. I am 67 years old.

Education:

I have a Bachelors degree from the University of California, Sacramento in Business Administration. I also have an upper graduate certificate in banking and finance from the Pacific Coast Bank School at the University of Washington in Seattle, which took me another 3 years to obtain.

How long have you lived in Sugar City?

I have lived 35 years in Sugar City, living in the same home for all of those years.

Why do you want to run for Mayor again?

I have served as Mayor for the last four years. The last two years have been a very difficult time, and the council and I were not able to get many things done. Now that we will be having a different council, I would like to see if we could accomplish new things to help the city, and finish off those things, such as the water project, that have not yet been finished.

What experience do you bring to the office of Mayor?

For the last 25 years of my career I helped to operate two economic development companies. We worked closely with many public entities to help them.

I have served on and been staff to many boards, including the two that we had with the companies we operated. I have been the main financial manager for these multi-million dollar businesses, and have created and managed large budgets, including the millions of dollars we used to help public and private entities.

Glenn Dalling asked me to serve on the Planning & Zoning Commission, which I did for five years, the last two as chairman. He then asked me to run for Mayor, where I have been serving for the last fours years. I have had many years of managing people, and helping to support them in their own jobs. My experiences has almost always been good ones.

If elected, what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

I think Sugar City is a great community. There is much going on with neighbor helping neighbor, that not much needs to change. However, I believe that change in our community will happen. I believe the the city council and I can help to control that growth, and that the current city code will help us to make that growth look good.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Sugar City?

The biggest challenge to Sugar City is that our tax base is small enough, especially in our road budgets, that we are always struggling to keep up. I believe that if we can show ourselves as a business friendly community, that the tax base will grow. This last year we sold six lots in the business park, we helped Pro-Peat build in our community, and we are going to annex most if not all of the businesses on highway 33 down to the Moody Road. We cannot force this, but we can certainly help it along.

How did you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate’s Controversy?

I did everything I could as your Mayor to keep the city neutral in the legal battle between Old Farm Estates and the Citizens for the Rule of Law. We were successful in settling the legal issues without making the city liable in the process. Even though this cost the city some money, I believe that we can now move forward, and hopefully heal the city.

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

We have had a very successful Sugar Days celebration, and I and my staff heard many comments that give us hope that the city is in fact healing. I believe the best way to heal is to put the issues behind us, forgive each other, and then move on to more productive issues. I am grateful to those who supported me in the recall election, and I am asking for that same support in the upcoming election.

STEVE ADAMS

Occupations and Age: Educator: 47

Education: Bachelor's in Business, M.S. and Ph.D. in Education

How long have you lived in Sugar City? In December it will be 11 years.

Why do you want to run for Mayor?

We have had a substantial amount of time in controversy that has brought a lot of division and kept us from moving forward together and attending to many other issues that sorely need attention. I feel that I can recognized the strengths of both sides of our controversy and have a vision of the correct process that will allow us to come together and move in a direction that is best for all of Sugar, as well as attend to the day-to-day duties of mayor.

What experience do you bring to the office of Mayor?

I have spent a great deal of my career in public administration both in public education and state office administration. Many of the laws related to open meetings, public accountability, public finance, and others are similar to city governance. I also have strong experience bringing groups together who start with very different views. I have negotiated several charter school agreements between startups and their authorizers, improvement contracts for struggling schools and their authorizers, and agreements between the state and local authorizers as well as the state and the Federal Department of Education. I now negotiate agreements between institutions of higher education.

As a part of my work with public entities, I have chaired several boards, reported to a variety of boards, and trained public boards in sound operation and open meeting laws. I also prepared and oversaw public budgets, both large and small. This will serve me well in working with the city council and ensuring transparency and improving relations. While in Florida, I was also certified as a mediator and participated in court mediation as well as charter school mediation. That skill set will likely be of great benefit as we work through some of the issues facing Sugar City.

In my current assignment, I have worked closely with some of the best attorneys in the world as we worked through legal compliance in all 50 states and over 100 countries. Past assignments have included drafting bills that became laws, writing administrative code, and direct involvement in various legal proceedings. I am well versed in legal language, and process. If our recent history is an indicator, having a working understanding of the law and experience managing sound legal counsel will likely be more important than any of us want it to be.

The most important experience I bring is my track record with building high performing teams. Throughout my career I (have been) training staff to fulfill the public purpose for which they are employed, as well as bringing in the right people to help us achieve our mission. Along with sound leadership and management skills, I bring experience as an innovator and problem solver. Those skills will serve Sugar City well as we face our challenges.

If elected what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

There is not much I want to change in Sugar City as a community. It is an amazing place to live, raise a family, and enjoy the association of great people. Part of why I am running is to help bring back a less abrasive public dialoged associated with city decision making and improve the overall transparency and congeniality. That will also significantly reduce the legal wrangling and financial liabilities we have seen in the recent past.

Mainly, I would like to see each perspective valued and each individual respected during the discussion of issues facing the community. Whatever the decisions are, the process should be fair and open. Those in elected office should be supported by the city, citizens expressing their views should be respected, and when changes are proposed, all views should be included in the decision-making process. Part of this goes to following legal process. The laws were established to accomplish what I have described above. If the right processes are followed, then the community can disagree on a wide variety of issues, but those different perspectives don't thwart the unity and civility that make this such a great place to live.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Sugar City?

I think the biggest challenge is the perception of division that exists. I say "perception" because much of what we have is not actually division, just difference of opinion or perspective. It has led to some division, but that is not necessary and can be quickly corrected. It is likely that differences will always exist, as they have in the past, but we can listen more and argue less. We can allow respectful public discourse and ensure transparency. As we do this, our differences will have space to be resolved, they will lead to far less misunderstanding, and allow for sound, inclusive decision making.

How did you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate's Controversy?

There are several issues related to development, and not with just the one development mentioned above, but all of them could be dramatically improved with open, fair process. Not just for the citizens and the city but for other property owners and developers. Sound process and transparency leads to trust. Trust will lead to confidence among the various stakeholders and the city. That will lead to the type of growth that benefits developers, landowners, well established residents, and those great families, individuals, and businesses that have been and will be joining our city.

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

Healing will come as we move forward tackling our issues as a community. I remember when city council members had quite intense debates with incredibly stark opinions, and then afterward, met as friends over a burger and milkshake. Recognizing our differences, allowing each voice to be heard, ensuring legal and open process is followed, then, making decisions informed by the best information available. That simple formula allows us to handle the tough issues with a desire to do the best we can, maintain our respect and collegiality with each other, and be cohesive as a community.

BRENT BARRUS:

Occupation: Retired from Beehive Federal Credit Union as a mortgage loan officer for 27 years. Farmed for 27 years.

Age: 72

Education: graduated from Brigham Young University in agricultural economics in 1971. Did some advanced education in agricultural economics. Went to Ricks College two years where I got an Associates Degree.

How long have you lived in Sugar City?

Over 60 years. I was raised there. I was gone for a few years for a Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Ohio from 1967 to 1969.

Why do you want to run for city council?

I think we’re in a position for a lot of good things to happen. The bond just passed to build a new Junior High School, and I feel like we’re in a position. There’s going to be a lot of good things (happening here). There will be some good growth. We'll get some businesses into the city, I feel like we’re in a great position. Right now we have a lot of opportunities for the citizens. I feel like it’s a good time to serve the citizens.

You're running for office again despite being named in a recall election. Why did you decide to run again?

I think the citizens, through the recall election, gave me a great vote of approval as well as the mayor. I felt like that was a real positive thing for both the mayor and I.

What experience do you bring to the office of City Council?

I've been a councilman on the city council for three years. I previously served 8 years on city council. I was on Planning and Zoning for a year. I’ve served on agricultural committees and also on irrigation committees.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Sugar City?

The biggest challenge is growth and in meeting the growth that will come. I don’t think it will be fast growth. It will be slow to moderate growth. That'll be the challenge. I want to make sure it’s the kind of growth we want, that we’re on top of it, make sure it’s good growth and that it will be a benefit to our city and the citizens of sugar city.

How do you feel about the Old Farm's Controversy?

That has been adjudicated in the courts. We’ve had a settlement agreement. I feel that’s behind us. I feel we just need to move on. That’s already basically been settled. That settled the zoning. When people come in to bring business or complexes, they'll still have to go through the process and through the Planning and Zoning and so forth. That part of it is behind us. We just need to move forward.

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

We need to unite all of us. We need to have all the citizens work together. We need to get viewpoints in the city and then go forward and make right decisions. We need to be sure and be very communicative with the citizens about what’s going on and get their input. If we can get their input and to feel a part, I feel we’ll heal quickly.

CONNIE FOGLE

Occupations and Age: I have been a Small Business Owner and currently work as an Associate Broker with Century 21 High Desert in Rexburg.

Education: Rio Hondo College Whittier California. Eastern Idaho Technical College for Realtor and Broker License

How long have you lived in Sugar City? Nearly 20 years

Why do you want to run for City Council?

The answer is two fold! Our community has offered so much opportunity to my family that I would like to give back. Also, having the Governor appoint me to fill this position has been a true honor. I feel I have been a good fit and positive influence in the leadership of our council, and I would like to continue serving our citizens.

What experience do you bring to the office of City council?

I have 14 years experience serving on governing boards in my industry at local, state and national levels as well as serving as President at the local, state and affiliate levels. Dealing with land use and private property rights issues in my industry has given me the needed understanding necessary for the council to have at this time.

If elected, what would you like to see change in Sugar City? What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Sugar City. How did you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate’s Controversy? (See Below)

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

That’s in the rear-view mirror. We are moving on. There are good things in Sugar City’s future. We are working on growth, infrastructure, the importance of bringing commercial business in town to help our tax base. About 2/3 of our residents are still in the flood plain and flood insurance costs our property owners hundreds of dollars per year. We are working with Rexburg and the county on a new flood plain act that will, hopefully, take Sugar out of the flood plain. We need that map to be accurate.

STEVE DAVIS

How long have you lived in Sugar City?

Off and on for 16 years. Most recently, the last 3 years.

Why do you want to run for City Council?

Just a simple desire to serve our community. We first lived in Sugar from 1988-2001. While the city was much smaller, I never sensed any division or controversy. I would like to see the city heal and be less divided.

What experience do you bring to the office of City council?

Over 30 years in higher education leadership and volunteer service in education and banking.

If elected, what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

A more unified community where shared values bring us together and different opinions are welcomed, but do not lead to divisions.

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Sugar City?

Managed growth. With the expected continued growth of the university, population and business growth will impact our town. Growth can be a blessing, especially as it impacts and increases our tax base. However, growth should be managed within the vision of the comprehensive plan.

How did you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate's Controversy?

Having only recently returned to Sugar City, I was not involved in this issue. My historical background is limited to conversations I hear from friends and neighbors. My goal is to keep an open mind and not to take sides -- to encourage an open and fair dialogue which will help our city come back together.

JOY BALL

Occupations and Age:

Retired educator (taught first grade for 34 years and then adjunct for BYU-Idaho.) Co-owner with my sister of a home business: J & J Tutoring in Sugar City. Second Home business: Joy’s Joys. I am 65 years old.

Education: Associates degree from Ricks College and BS degree in Elementary and Special Education from BYU-Provo.

How long have you lived in Sugar City?

My whole life other than when I attended BYU and served an 18 month mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in New Zealand.

Why do you want to run for City Council?

I want to represent the people. I feel that I have not completed the mandate of the people from when I was elected in November of 2017. A watchman is needed to ensure city code is followed, and that there is a distinct separation of powers and enumeration of powers in our city government. There is a need to reestablish trust and respect in elected and appointed offices.

What experience do you bring to the office of City Council?

Sugar City Planning and Zoning Commission, Sugar City Councilwoman, Completed training by the Association of Idaho Cities, Liaison to the Tree and Beautification Committee, Participated in both Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints ward and stake councils where the focus is on counseling together and coming to a consensus of opinion.

If elected what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

Volunteers treated with more respect and trust so more citizens will want to serve, water rates equal for all—the majority should not be subsidizing discounts for a few high volume users, city council more involved in setting the budget and lowering administrative costs significantly, follow up when code violations of builders are not corrected, decrease in vandalism and increased police patrols or established Neighborhood Watch program, bike lanes on high traffic roads used by children to get to the schools, decentralize Power and build autonomy within appointed commissions

What do you think is the biggest challenge facing Sugar City?

Growing pains! Our growth is affecting our neighborhoods, our schools, our taxes, and more. We must be proactive in seeking to bring a proportional percentage of growth in the business sector to increase our tax revenue. At the same time, we must be guided by the Comprehensive Plan to retain the small town feel of this community. This requires thoughtful discussion, not forced ideas.

How did you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate’s Controversy?

It is an event that could have been prevented. It’s a dark place in our city’s history. However, no peace comes from dwelling on anger or hurt.

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

Serve the people, listen to the people, respect and trust the people, focus on neighborhoods and people first, then big projects; legislate for the best good of all people while being guided by the Comprehensive Plan.

Catherine Nielsen:

Occupation and Age

Half owner of Millwork of Idaho in St. Anthony.

Education:

AA degree from Contra Costa Jr. College, BA degree from Sacramento State College, Majoring in Anthropology, Minoring in History and Psychology.

How long have you lived in Sugar City?

31 Years

Why do you want to run for City Council?

Sugar City's residents deserve a fair and transparent City Council where everyone has a voice.

At time of recall of Mayor Ogden and Councilman Barrus, you said you wouldn't run, what changed your mind?

I was asked and encouraged by a number of concerned citizens to run.

What experience do you bring to to the office of City Council?

I regularly attend city council and planning and zoning meetings and research state and local codes, the comprehensive plan, LLUPA manual and other documents essential to city government, which would be an asset to serving on the Council.

How did you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate's Controversy?

The controversy was unfortunate; however, there are many lessons we can learn from it to build a better future. We also need to allow Planning and Zoning to do their job.

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

I would like to help create a vision of a brighter future for Sugar City where the best interest of all the citizens is a priority.

If elected, what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

I would like to see a transparent city government in which citizens could communicate directly with the City Council and Mayor.

What do you think the biggest challenge facing Sugar City?

Learning from the past and moving forward.

CLYDE HAACKE:

Occupation: Semi-retired business owner. I run a specialty tire business. I design tires and wheels for snowcats. I am 83 years old.

Education: I went to Brigham Young University. I was there in 1967, 1968 and 1969. I majored in communications. I’ve been thinking about going back and finishing. I can do it online. I went to high school at Davis High School in Davis County Utah and graduated in 1954.

How long have you lived in Sugar City?

I've lived here since 1977.

Why do you want to run for city council?:

We had kind of a mess out here. Things weren’t really settled properly (with Old Farm Estates). I’m mainly a guy that doesn’t like a lot of problems they can’t be settled.

What experience do you bring to the office of city council?

I just bring common sense. I have business experience. I went into business while I was in college and since I left BYU. I started Tri State Tire here in Rexburg, and we sold tires in three states.

If elected what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

I’d like to see the council and the mayor operate as a true council and mayor. It isn’t that I’m against progress or growth, but the only places we can really grow is across the freeway. That’s kind of a deal that the city hasn’t followed up on.

What do you think the biggest challenges are facing Sugar City?

We're going to have to grow. We don't have any choice. We can’t go back to horse and buggy days. You’ve got to grow. Growth means you need to bring business in. That’s got to happen. We’ve got to get some calmness in the city now.

How do you feel about the recent Old Farm Estate's controversy?

It’s done whether we like it or not. It’s done.

How do you plan to help the city heal from the controversy?

The city needs to be more transparent and needs to involve the citizens in the decision that are made.

DEVERL STODDARD

Occupation: I was involved in DePatco Construction. I’m the “D” in DePatco. I have been a school teacher. I taught school at Bonneville High School.I was retired from DePatco Construction. I’m the "D" in DePatco. I have been a schoolteacher. I taught school at Bonneville High School. I taught school at the youth training center in St. Anthony.

Age: 80

Education: Industrial arts bachelors of science in Industrial Arts in1961, Masters in Industrial Education Utah State University in 1967. Graduated from South Fremont High School in 1957. Attended Ricks College in 1961.

Why do you want to run for City Council?

Because I think I can be of service to the community. I think it’s the responsibility of everyone to be involved somewhat in civic responsibilities. Any experience develops a character and so every one of these experiences I had allowed me to build on the background that I feel would help me serve as a city councilman.

If elected what would you like to see change in Sugar City?

I would like to see structured growth. I would like to see autonomy within the community and unity.

What do you think is the biggest challenge in Sugar City?

Basically, it’s understanding why things are done within the community. If the people have understanding, they then realize why something has to be done. If they don’t get that understanding, they never will learn why things are done.

How do you feel about the recent Old Farm Estates controversy?

That decision was made by a recall attempt, and the citizens of the community voted to put that in their past. Really to regurgitate old issues that theoretically have been resolved does not build the community.

How can you help the city heal?

The patrons of the community will bring issues forth, and to quote (U.S. Representative) Trey Gowdy “facts determine the witness.” If you do not have the facts, you have no witness. I’m saying if people understand the facts, they’ll understand why certain things are done. If they don’t they’re in the dark.